Intensive Program for Anxiety and OCD

The Intensive Program for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) at Bradley Hospital provides treatment to children and adolescents, ages 5 to 18, who experience significant impairment in their daily lives due to OCD and obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders.

Treatment takes place Monday through Friday at Bradley Hospital. Program hours depend on a child’s level of care. We offer a full-day partial program with community-based sessions every day, and a half-day program with community-based sessions two days per week. The average length of treatment is approximately eight weeks.

 

Among the conditions we treat are:

  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

  • Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD)

  • Panic Disorder

  • Social Anxiety

  • Separation Anxiety

  • Phobias

  • Hypochondria/health anxiety

  • Trichotillomania (hair-pulling)

  • Dermatillomania (skin-picking)

Treatment Approach

 

The goal of the Intensive Program for OCD treatment is to alleviate OCD symptoms while improving daily functioning and promoting further involvement in school, social, and family activities. Ours is the only program on the East Coast to use a milieu-based intensive treatment model with this age group.

At the forefront of OCD treatment and research, our clinical team uses a form of cognitive behavioral therapy called exposure with response prevention (ERP). The treatment of choice for individuals with OCD, exposure with response prevention strengthens a child’s ability to manage anxiety by gradually facing fears and reducing the repetitive rituals of OCD.

 

In line with PARC’s values of integrating research and clinical work to provide evidence-based treatment to children and adolescents, we offer a full spectrum of research informed services, including individual, family, group, and milieu therapy. Our clinicians create an individualized, age-appropriate treatment plan for each child. Parents and family members contribute to this plan, starting with the child’s evaluation and continuing throughout treatment.

The Intensive Program for OCD can be an effective care option for youth who have not responded to traditional once a week outpatient treatment or who lack specialized OCD services where they live.

Treatment Components

 
  • Individual therapy: Individual therapy occurs twice a week to develop and refine the child’s therapeutic plan, as well as practice exposure and response prevention exercises.

  • Psychiatric care: The program’s psychiatrist meets weekly with each patient. If a participant is already seeing a psychiatrist, the program psychiatrist will work in consultation with him or her. If a participant is in need of medication, the psychiatrist will work with parents to develop a medication plan.

  • Family therapy: OCD has an impact on the whole family and with family support children are much more likely to have positive outcomes. For these reasons, families are asked to commit to family therapy once a week. These meetings will focus on enhancing the relationship between parents and their children, as well as other members of the family.

  • Milieu therapy: Twice each program day milieu staff run exposure groups during which they assist patients with completing individualized exposure exercises devised by their doctors.  Art therapy groups are provided by a certified art therapist twice a week. In addition to exposure and art groups, all children participate in group activities designed to enhance their understanding of and motivation to engage in exposure therapy.  The specific content of these groups changes over time and is tailored to the needs of the patients.  Examples of group activities include process groups, team building, and mindfulness.

  • “Home” visits: Milieu staff run individualized exposure tasks in the community and child’s home, which helps reinforce the therapeutic benefits of the program in real-world settings. Visits are provided 5 days per week in the full-day partial program and 2 days per week in the half-day partial program. We ask that at least one parent is available to participate in these visits so that they can learn how to assist their child with the exposures.

  • Research: We pride ourselves on delivering cutting edge, research-informed treatment. This is an ongoing process and requires careful assessment of treatment outcome and treatment delivery. During your child’s first week in the program, a research assistant will approach you to ask if you would be willing to participate in research. Research includes using some of the forms you and your child complete during clinical care for research purposes. Participation in research is completely optional and will not affect the care your child receives in the program. Learn more about research at PARC here!

Care Team

 

Jennifer Freeman Ph.D

Director of Research and Training

Jennifer Freeman, PhD is the Director of Research and Training at the Pediatric Anxiety Research Center (PARC) at Bradley HospitalDr. Freeman is also the an associate professor (research) of psychiatry and human behavior at The Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

 

Dr. Freeman received her BA from Wesleyan University. She completed her doctoral training at the State University of New York at Buffalo, completed a predoctoral internship at the Brown University clinical psychology training program, and was a postdoctoral fellow in child and pediatric psychology at The Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University.

 

Dr. Freeman's research interests are in the area of child and adolescent anxiety disorders. Her particular interests include obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), cognitive behavioral family interventions, and developmental psychopathology. Her current research focuses on dissemination of treatment and training programs for treatment providers in the area of exposure therapy. She was the PI on an NIMH-funded multisite trial of exposure-based treatment for young children with OCD, site PI or Co-I on a number of past treatment trials for childhood OCD, and currently, and an MPI on an NIMH funded R21/R33. In her free time, Dr. Freeman enjoys running with her golden retriever, Cora.

Abbe Garcia Ph.D.

Clinical Director of Bradley Hospital’s Intensive Program for OCD

Abbe Garcia, PhD is the clinical director of the Pediatric Anxiety Research Clinic (PARC) and of Bradley Hospital’s Intensive Program for OCD.Dr. Garcia is also an associate professor (clinical) of psychiatry and human behavior at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

 

Dr. Garcia received a BA in psychology from Williams College. She did her graduate training at Temple University, completed a predoctoral internship at the Brown University clinical psychology training program, and was a postdoctoral fellow in child and pediatric psychology at The Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University.

 

Dr. Garcia’s current research interests are connected to quality improvement efforts in the Intensive Program for OCD. She is interested in using objective measures of outcome to demonstrate clinical changes and in using these data to guide further development of the treatment approach used in this program. Dr. Garcia enjoys swimming in her free time. Her family has a pet bird named Buddy.

Brady Case MD

medical director of the Bradley Hospital Intensive Program for OCD

Brady Case, MD is medical director of the Bradley Hospital Intensive Program for OCD. He is an assistant professor (research) of psychiatry and human behavior at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University and of health services, policy, and practice at the Brown School of Public Health.Brady received his undergraduate and medical degrees from Harvard University. He completed psychiatry residency and clinical research training at New York University and child psychiatry fellowship at Brown, where he was trained in the treatment of pediatric OCD. Prior to returning to Brown, Brady was a research psychiatrist in the statistics and services research division at the Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research and the NYU Child Study Center.He also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

 

His research has focused on the use and quality of care for pediatric mental disorders in the US. Brady also has experience examining patterns of mental health and substance use disorder and mental health service use in complex epidemiologic samples, public and private administrative claims, and health care provider surveys.

Jennifer A. Herren Ph.D.

Staff Psychologist

Jennifer Herren, PhD is a staff psychologist at the Pediatric Anxiety Research Center (PARC) and a clinical assistant professor in the department of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University. She specializes in the use of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and exposure therapy in treatment of pediatric anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Dr. Herren is also a senior clinical consultant and trainer in the use of the treatment intervention, Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC), and serves as a co-investigator on the R01: Quality Assessment in Exposure Therapy. 

Herren received her BA from Maryville College and PhD from the University of Texas at Austin. She completed her predoctoral internship at Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, where she gained specific training in pediatric psychology. She completed her postdoctoral fellowship, specializing in child and adolescent psychology, at Judge Baker Children’s Center and Harvard University. 

She is an active member of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Her research interests focus on how to effectively disseminate and increase use of evidence-based practices in community practice as well as on the etiology and treatment of comorbid anxiety and depression.

Michael R. Walther Ph.D.

Staff Psychologist

Michael Walther, PhD is a psychologist at Bradley Hospital and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

He received his bachelor’s degree from Pennsylvania State University and doctorate from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He is currently completing a fellowship under the T32 National Research Service Award from the National Institute of Mental Health.

Dr. Walther joined the Pediatric Anxiety Research Center (PARC) in 2011 as part of his predoctoral internship at Brown University. He is interested in the phenomenology, etiology, and treatment of anxiety and obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders, including OCD, hair-pulling disorder (trichotillomania), and tic disorders.

Elizabeth Brannan MD

Staff Psychiatrist

Elizabeth Brannan, MD, is an attending psychiatrist in the Intensive Program for OCD at Bradley Hospital, and an assistant professor (clinician educator track) in the department of psychiatry and human behavior at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. She is the co-director of both the first-year medical student brain sciences course and the longitudinal third-year medical student integration seminar. She also supervises and lectures in the child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship program and Triple Board residency program.

Dr. Brannan earned her medical degree at the University of California at Davis. She pursued combined training in psychiatry and pediatrics through the Triple Board Program (pediatrics, general psychiatry, child and adolescent psychiatry) at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, where she focused on pediatric palliative care, the medical-psychiatric interface, and pediatric anxiety disorders

Joseph Berryhill Ph.D.

Staff Psychologist

Joseph Berryhill, PhD, is a clinical psychologist at the Pediatric Anxiety Research Center (PARC).  He specializes in the use of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to treat pediatric anxiety disorders. Dr. Berryhill received his B.A. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his Ph.D. in clinical and community psychology from the University of South Carolina.  He completed his education with a clinical internship and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Yale University School of Medicine.

David W McConville Ph.D.

Staff Psychologist

David McConville, PhD is a clinical psychologist who specializes in therapy with children, adolescents, and their families. He directs the family therapy clinic at Bradley Hospital and is the co-director for family therapy training for the child psychiatry fellowship and triple board residency at Brown University. McConville is also a clinical assistant professor in the department of psychiatry and human behavior at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

Amy B. Funkenstein MD

Staff Psychiatrist

Sarah Morris

Clinical Psychology Resident

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Admissions

 
  • The Intensive Program for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder is designed for children and adolescents who experience significant impairment in their daily lives and functioning due to OCD or obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders. The child or teen, as well as his or her caretaker(s), must be committed to participating in all phases of treatment.

  • The program can be an effective care option for youth who have not responded to traditional outpatient treatment or who lack specialized OCD services where they live. Significant impact on children may be defined by school avoidance, withdrawal from family/friends, loss of interest in previously enjoyed activities, and problems eating, sleeping, and bathing.

  • For youth to participate in the program, they must:

    • Be between 5 and 18 years old

    • Not need 24-hour medical supervision

    • Be willing and able to maintain safe behavior during treatment

Bradley Hospital

1011 Veterans Memorial Pkwy

East Providence, Providence County

02915 USA